#MagnifyMarchHT: Redrafted, rebooted and refreshed

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Another month dawns, and hot on the heels of #ForteFebruaryHT comes #MagnifyMarchHT. It is a year since the publication of the original post and it follows in the footsteps of February in celebrating what we do well, but standing in the face of drains on positivity. We may be in the grip of the Beast from the East but we are also mere weeks from St Patrick’s Day, Easter and … the Summer Term!!

“Negativity comes easily to many. It is quick, simple and painless to deliver. A put down, a gesture, an ill-considered text or tweet; they fuel the ego but hurt the recipient. Negativity about ourselves comes equally easily. When we are negative about ourselves we don’t fuel egos but we can drag ourselves down.”

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One of the keys to successful wellbeing in our schools is growing a culture in which positivity thrives and where negativity is starved of oxygen. Disagreement and discussion do not represent negativity, but being set in ones ways and being determinedly inflexible does. Positive thoughts and comments can impact the mood of a whole staff in a way that can genuinely make someone feel good about themselves. However this does need to be authentic and reflect the integrity of the person delivering it. We all recognise the stilted communal praise that might come at the end of a term largely punctuated with criticism and may question the authenticity of it. Consider the difference that an aside, a note, card or even a simple gift can make. It becomes personal, real and memorable.

“Teachers are sadly very good at being negative about themselves and it is easy to see why. Teaching can be a lonely task at times. If you have had a tough day and it comes to 3.30 on a cold, damp and darkening winter afternoon, the children have gone and you might be alone with only a pile of books and your own melancholy to keep you company. We tend to be very self -critical as a profession and if we don’t self-manage workload or deadlines we can add to this.”

Be aware of what you and what others do well.

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In magnifying the achievements of our staff, school leaders need to know that by identifying success and raising its profile we can boost the confidence and self image of our colleagues. Authenticity is important here. Finding one nugget in a poor lesson shouldn’t divert from the priority of challenging the quality of teaching, but it may be a way into developing that teacher’s skillset. In a wider context, ‘thank you’ and ‘well done’ cost nothing, are polite, demonstrate good human values and they become habit forming. Creating and maintaining this positive culture in the school will show everyone is equally valued and encourage them to be positive about their own successes.

Magnify our own successes: find a positive in day and praise yourself for it. Even better find five or ten different things that went well, note them and refer back to them at the end of the week, month or year. Tweet it or blog it but not to the point of inflating your ego; we can all teach well, but we all do it in our way. Magnify your core rather than your ego because your core spirit and values, as well as our physical core, upholds you as an individual.

Share successes: displays, progress, small or larger steps in learning. Share what you do outside too: climbing; baking; fitness. If it’s important to you, make it count and be proud of it.

If we are authentic in our praise of others then we can be genuine in reflecting upon our own successes. In a successful team, a diverse range of talents makes the collective whole run smoothly. You might be the creative one, the philosophical one, the practical one or the organised one. Recognise yourself for what you do well as well as acknowledge the role of others.

Be you. Be brave. Be fabulous. Be kind. Be grounded. Be real. Be authentic. Be ordinary. Be extraordinary.

Just be…..

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